B2End Interiors’ Exclusive Interview with SMOA Installation Artist Patrick Dougherty

Ever wonder if the home of an artist is as interesting as the artwork? Patrick Dougherty left little doubt, evidenced by the beautiful images of his log cabin home, featured in the New York Times:
The sculptor Patrick Dougherty’s home in North Carolina. Photo by Randy Harris for the New York Times.

The sculptor Patrick Dougherty’s home in North Carolina. Photo by Randy Harris for the New York Times.

B2End spoke to Patrick Dougherty about his own interior design sensibilities, including how his work influences his home’s style.

 
B2End: What kind of interior design would we find in your own home?
 
PD:  I would have to say it is rustic and antique-y, homespun with a lot of natural materials. I am drawn to the idea of simple shelter – the unencumbered
 
B2End: What elements of craftsmanship are you drawn to?
 
PD: I am very drawn to being in touch with the natural world…so while I of course enjoy craftsmanship, I am happy with what some would perceive as imperfections…knots in wood, that type of thing.
 
B2End: What makes your house a home?
 
PD: A home is one still very much in connection with the natural world. My work embodies a lot of those same characteristics, a devotion to natural materials. A house becomes a home when it becomes an extension of what is happening outside.
 
B2End: What advice would you give people who want to incorporate the natural world into their home?
 
PD: I like to think of a home as a bird’s nest. Let your home evolve over time.
 
PD: Don’t over-think your interior design, don’t ruin it by planning too much. Instead, give your home a chance to develop itself. Be open to new ideas! If you see something you like, don’t be afraid to incorporate it – let your home be a continuation of your own life and the life outdoors.
Patrick Dougherty (right) of Chapel Hill, N.C., also known as the Stick Guy, creates a stick sculpture from Crate Myrtle sapling outside of the Sarasota Museum of Art with the help of volunteers. The stick sculpture is slated to be in place for two years.January 14, 2013  Photo by Carla Varisco-Williams

Patrick Dougherty (right) of Chapel Hill, N.C., also known as the Stick Guy, creates a stick sculpture from Crate Myrtle sapling outside of the Sarasota Museum of Art with the help of volunteers. The stick sculpture is slated to be in place for two years.
January 14, 2013 Photo by Carla Varisco-Williams

Internationally renowned sculptor Patrick Dougherty just completed a three-week stay in Sarasota, Florida, where he took to the grounds of the historic Sarasota High School and Sarasota Museum of Art (SMOA) to create one of his signature works: large scale architectural forms composed of tree branches, vines and other natural materials.
Beginning to End Interiors co-owners Alan Graveley and Stan Writesel celebrate the opening of SMOA with donor Sherry Koski

Beginning to End Interiors co-owners Alan Gravley and Stan Writesel celebrate the opening of SMOA with donor Sherry Koski

For more information about Patrick Dougherty and his amazing artwork, visit www.stickwork.net.